CALL FOR SPECIAL ISSUE PROPOSALS

Society & Natural Resources (SNR) is currently accepting proposals for special issues, which will address the scope of SNR and take into account – although not be necessarily limited to – the following four topical foci of concentration: (1) Protected area management/governance; (2) stakeholder analysis, consultation and engagement; deliberation processes; natural resource governance; conflict resolution; social learning; social impact assessment; (3) theoretical frameworks, epistemological issues, and methodological perspectives; (4) multiscalar character of social implications of natural resource management.

We especially welcome submissions from research groups presenting and elaborating on the implications of the research projects they are working on or research projects which have been concluded.

We invite interested applicants to submit proposals (see guidelines for submission and review below) by October 31, 2018 to the Editors-in-Chief: Tasos Hovardas ([email protected]) and Linda Prokopy ([email protected]).

SNR Guidelines for submission and review of special issue proposals and manuscripts

  1. SNR special issues must be devoted to a particular themeof broad interest to the readership of the journal (social science researchers in universities, resource/environmental agencies, andprivate research organizations or NGOs). Special issue proposals should be submitted by the authors who will act as Guest Editors of the issue, after they have contacted other authors and secured the list of manuscripts, which will be submitted for the special issue upon acceptance of the proposal. Each proposal should include (a) the main rationale and approach of guest editors (which will be later on developed to become the introductory chapter of the special issue) and for each paper: (b) author names, (c) article type (among SNR article categories), (d) and an extended summary, with a special focus on (i) the innovatory aspects of the contribution, (ii) methods, and (iii) implications (about 500 words for each paper). A draft timeline should also be included, with indicative deadlines for manuscript submission.
  2. SNR special issues will normally consist of an introductory chapter authored by Guest Editors and up to five or six additional papers, depending on article type and word count. The introductory chapter should provide an overarching context for the topic and an overview of the papers published in the special issue. If the final set of special issue papers accepted is too small to fill the space of a full SNR issue, individual papers that proceed successfully through the review process will be published in regular issues of SNR.
  3. 3. SNR special issues are guest edited by the applicants who submit the special issue proposal. Guest Editors will be granted the status of Associate Editors during the review process for the special issue and they will take over standard editorial operations for the manuscripts submitted for the special issue through ScholarOne (finding and assigning Reviewers, contacting Authors, making a recommendation to Editors-in-Chief), under the supervision and guidance of Editors-in-Chief of SNR. The final decisions for the content of special issues and the acceptance or rejection of articles submitted will be the responsibility of Editors-in-Chief. However, any decision will be made in close collaboration with Guest Editors.

Sincerely,
Tasos Hovardas ([email protected]) & Linda S. Prokopy ([email protected]),

Editors-in-Chief of Society & Natural Resources

Society & Natural Resources is the Official Journal of the International Association for Society and Natural Resources (https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/usnr20/current). Society & Natural Resources publishes cutting edge social science research that advances understanding of the interaction between society and natural resources. While we welcome all papers that fit within this broad scope, we especially welcome papers in the following four important and broad areas in the field: (1) Protected area management and governance; (2) stakeholder analysis, consultation and engagement; deliberation processes; natural resource governance; conflict resolution; social learning; social impact assessment; (3) theoretical frameworks, epistemological issues, and methodological perspectives; (4) multiscalar character of social implications of natural resource management.